Two owls

Owls

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Season 12 (12-14-2010)

Full Show: Owls are pretty amazing. They have special adaptations to help them survive. What are they? Can they really turn their heads all the way around? Do they only come out at night? Are they wise like ancient Greeks and Romans thought? Guest scientists Vicky Runnoe (Idaho Department of Fish and Game) and Barb Forderhase (Bureau of Land Management) answer these and other questions about owls.

Hi-bandwidth (Play here)    Hi-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Lo-bandwidth (Play here)    Lo-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Ultra Hi-bandwidth Windows Media (Click to play; right-click to download)
Audio-only MP3 MP3 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)

Video Short: An owl's eyes, neck and wings are all specially adapted to help this predator hunt and survive in the wild.

Hi-bandwidth (Play here)    Hi-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Lo-bandwidth (Play here)    Lo-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Ultra Hi-bandwidth Windows Media (Click to play; right-click to download)
Audio-only MP3 MP3 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)

Web Extra: Guest scientists Vicky Runnoe and Barb Forderhase stay after to answer more questions about owls.

Hi-bandwidth (Play here)    Hi-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Lo-bandwidth (Play here)    Lo-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Ultra Hi-bandwidth Windows Media (Click to play; right-click to download)
Audio-only MP3 MP3 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)

Season 9 (12-18-2007)

Full Show: Owls are amazing birds of prey. They are basically nocturnal and live a solitary life. There are over 200 different kinds of owls, and they live in almost every part of the world. Learn more about owls from our guest scientists, Vicky Runnoe from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Larry Ridenhour from the Bureau of Land Management.

Hi-bandwidth (Play here)    Hi-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Lo-bandwidth (Play here)    Lo-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Ultra Hi-bandwidth Windows Media (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Audio-only MP3 MP3 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)

Video Short: An owl's eyes, neck, and wings are all specially adapted to help this predator hunt and survive in the wild.

Hi-bandwidth (Play here)    Hi-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Lo-bandwidth (Play here)    Lo-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Ultra Hi-bandwidth Windows Media (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Audio-only MP3 MP3 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)

Web Extra: Vicky Runnoe and Larry Ridenhour stay after to answer more questions about owls.

Hi-bandwidth (Play here)    Hi-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Lo-bandwidth (Play here)    Lo-bandwidth (Download) Windows Media
Ultra Hi-bandwidth Windows Media (Click to play; right-click to download)
Video iPod format MP4 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)
Audio-only MP3 MP3 icon (Click to play; right-click to download)

 

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