Wetlands

January 18 , 2005

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BOG
Acidic wetland with no appreciable inflow or outflow of water; supports acid-loving mosses such as sphagnum, plus some shrubs and trees. Dead plants accumulate and compress, forming peat.

BOTTOMLANDS
Usually forested low lands in the floodplains of streams and rivers. Also called riparian wetlands or bottomland hardwood forests.

DELMARVA or CAROLINA BAY
Name for wetlands in the southeastern U.S. with acidic water in a basin filled by rain or ground water; may be seasonal, may support trees or shrubs.

FEN
Similar to bog (some scientists say bog and fen are the same); receives some water from surrounding mineral soils and supports marshlike plants, which form peat as they die and compress. In Northern Europe, called "mire."

MARSH
Fresh, brackish, or saltwater wetlands along rivers, creeks, ponds, lakes, and coasts; is often or always flooded; supports plants that grow up out of the water (emergent vegetation).

MIRE
A bog in Northern Europe.

MOOR
European term for one of two kinds of freshwater wetlands. High moor is a bog; low moor is a wetland in a basin or depression.


MUSKEG
Common in northern regions such as Alaska and Canada; is an expanse of very wet peatlands or bogs. Also called subarctic peatlands.

PEATLAND
Any wetland that forms peat, including bog, fen, moor, mire, muskeg.

PLAYA LAKE
Desert or Great Basin seasonal wetlands formed in depressions; usually dry by summer; plants are marshlike.

POCOSINS
Bogs in the coastal lowlands of the southeastern U.S.; supports shrubs.

PRAIRIE POTHOLES Depressions in the grasslands created by the scraping action of glaciers. They provide essential nesting and migratory rest-stops for birds. Confusion: wetlands in glaciated landscapes other than the prairies, such as the Palouse or mountain valleys-also have pothole-type wetlands.

RIPARIAN
Wetlands in the channel of a stream or river.

SLOUGH
In the northern U.S., refers to freshwater wetlands that can also be considered swamps or shallow lakes; in the southeastern U.S., refers to wetlands with flowing water, and can also be called swamps or marshes.

SWAMP
Any freshwater wetland supporting trees and shrubs; often found along rivers, slow streams, or in depressions.

WET MEADOW
Grassy area with saturated soils but not standing water.

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Identifying Wetlands |
Marking Wetlands |

What Lives in Wetlands |
Why Do We Need Wetlands?
|

Types of Wetlands |

Common Names of Wetlands |
Five Subsystems of Wetlands |

What is a Wetland? | Where are all the Wetlands? |
Inland Wetlands | Wetlands for the Future | People and Wetlands |
Classroom Activities | Wetland Facts | Wetland Links |

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