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Endangered Species: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

Kindergarten

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.2 [CCSS page]

Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/ explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

Suggested Lesson

Draw a picture to illustrate an endangered animal that you like and are concerned about.

First Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.1e [CCSS page]

Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).

Suggested Lesson

Write 3 sentences about an endangered animal that illustrate time (past, present, and future.) Relate the future tense to the animal's being rescued or becoming extinct.

Fifth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2 [CCSS page]

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

Suggested Lesson

Select an endangered species to research and share what you have learned about this animal through a diorama, a PowerPoint presentation, a brochure, or poster.

Math

Second Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.B.6 [CCSS page]

Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2 … , and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 on a number line diagram.

Suggested Lesson

Create a number line that represents the height of 5–10 endangered animals. Compare their heights.

Third Grade

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.NBT.A.1 [CCSS page]

Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

Suggested Lesson

Using a set of current and past population figures for 5 endangered species, round each number to the nearest 10 or 100 and compare the present and past population numbers.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2 [CCSS page]

Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Suggested Lesson

Research how many animals there are on the earth left of any endangered animals that live near your location. Write those numbers next to the animal names. Compare them to animal populations in your region that are not endangered.

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1 [ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

All animals need food in order to live and grow. They obtain their food from plants or from other animals. Examples of patterns could include the different kinds of food needed by different types of animals.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-K-2 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Plants and animals can change their environment. Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the world around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-1 [ICS page]

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.

Supporting Content:

Living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-3 [ICS page]

Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment.

Supporting Content:

Humans can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things. Examples of human impact on the land could include cutting trees to produce paper and using resources to produce bottles. Examples of solutions could include reusing paper and recycling cans and bottles. Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem's solutions to other people.

Second Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-2-2 [ICS page]

Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.

Supporting Content:

Plants depend on animals for pollination or to move their seeds around. Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem's solutions to other people.

Life Sciences: LS2-2-1 [ICS page]

Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

Supporting Content:

There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water.

Third Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-3-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

Supporting Content:

Being part of a group helps animals obtain food, defend themselves, and cope with changes.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-3-1 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the impacts of a weather-related hazard.

Supporting Content:

A variety of natural hazards result from natural processes. Humans cannot eliminate natural hazards but can take steps to reduce their impacts on living things.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their particular needs are met. A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life. Newly introduced species can damage the balance of an ecosystem.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-5-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago.

Supporting Content:

Some kinds of plants and animals that once lived on Earth are no longer found anywhere. Examples of data could include type, size, and distributions of fossil organisms. Examples of fossils could include fossils of extinct organisms.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.

Supporting Content:

Populations of animals are classified by their characteristics. Examples of cause and effect relationships could be that living things with stronger defenses may be less likely to be eaten by predators or that animals that have better camouflage coloration than other animals may be more likely to survive and therefore more likely to leave offspring.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Conduct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the organisms and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. When the environment changes in ways that affect a place's physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Support, obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth's resources and environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and organisms. Individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth's resources and environments.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. Emphasis is on cause and effect relationships between resources and growth of individual organisms and the numbers of organisms in ecosystems during periods of abundant and scarce resources.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-2 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Supporting Content:

Emphasis is on predicting consistent patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the relationships among and between organisms and abiotic components of ecosystems. Examples of types of interactions could include competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial. Predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Mutually beneficial interactions, in contrast, may become so interdependent that each organism requires the other for survival. Although the species involved in these competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments, both living and nonliving, are shared.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-5 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Supporting Content:

Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. Emphasis is on recognizing patterns in data and making warranted inferences about changes in populations, and on evaluating empirical evidence supporting arguments about changes to ecosystems.

Life Sciences LS2-MS-6 [ICS page]

Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Supporting Content:

Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth's terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem's biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem.

Earth and Space Sciences ESS3-MS-3 [ICS page]

Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities can have consequences (negative and positive) on the biosphere, sometimes altering natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. Examples of the design process include examining human environmental impacts, assessing the kinds of solutions that are feasible, and designing and evaluating solutions that could reduce that impact. Examples of human impacts can include water usage (such as the withdrawal of water from streams and aquifers or the construction of dams and levees), land usage (such as urban development, agriculture, or the removal of wetlands), and pollution (such as of the air, water, or land).

Earth and Space Sciences ESS3-MS-4 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth's systems.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence include grade-appropriate databases on human populations and the rates of consumption of food and natural resources (such as freshwater, mineral, and energy). The consequences of increases in human populations and consumption of natural resources are described by science, but science does not make the decisions for the actions society takes. Technology and engineering can potentially mitigate impacts on Earth's systems as both human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase.

Earth and Space Sciences ESS3-MS-5 [ICS page]

Ask questions to interpret evidence of the factors that cause climate variability over time.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence can include tables, graphs, and maps of global and regional temperatures, atmospheric levels of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, and natural resource use. Mitigating current changes in climate depends on understanding climate science. Current scientific models indicate that human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel combustion, are the primary factors in the measured rise in Earth's mean surface temperature. Natural activities, such as changes in incoming solar radiation, also contribute to changing global temperatures.

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