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Archaeology: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.1d [CCSS page]

Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).

Suggested Lesson

Use verbs in the past tense that relate to archaeology. Discuss correct verb forms. Examples: I dug up a bone. I digged up a bone. The person fell into the mud. The person falled into the mud. Which are correct?

Fourth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.3 [CCSS page]

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

Suggested Lesson

Using a real archaeological discovery, write a description as if you were the person who came upon it. How did you find it, what did you do next, what did it look like, etc. Consider a mummy tomb, an ancient civilization dig, or an historic site as your discovery.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.4 [CCSS page]

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.

Suggested Lesson

Read Bodies from the Bog by James M. Deem and determine the new terms and vocabulary you encounter during your reading. Create a glossary of your own for the book.

Math

Fourth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2 [CCSS page]

Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.

Suggested Lesson

Research the various ages of time in history — Stone Age, Iron Age, Renaissance, etc. — and create a timeline for them. Include how many years each lasted. Place them in chronological order.

Multiple Grades

Multiple geometry and measurement standards [CCSS page]

Suggested Lesson

Many groups of ancient people created images on the ground that, when seen from the air, demonstrate amazing accuracy, geometic knowledge and artistry. One example is the Nasca lines found in southern Peru — photos and information can be found at National Geographic and Museum of Unnatural Mystery. How did they do this? Create instructions to make a simple shape on the ground using angle measures, length of the sides, distances, etc. to give to a partner to follow. Stomp it out in the snow, lay string down or use paper to recreate the partner's instructions. Is it as easy or hard as you thought?

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1[ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

All animals need food in order to live and grow. All living things need water.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-K-2 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals, including humans, can change the environment to meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do to do live comfortably can affect the world around them.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-1 [ICS page]

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals and the places they live.

Supporting Content:

Living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need.

Second Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-2-1 [ICS page]

Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.

Supporting Content:

Some events happen very quickly; others occur very slowly, over a time period much longer than one can observe.

Third Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-3-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

Supporting Content:

Being part of a group helps animals obtain food, defend themselves, and cope with changes. Groups may serve different functions and vary dramatically in size.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Matter cycles between the air and soil and among plants, animals, and microbes as these organisms live and die. Decomposition eventually restores (recycles) some materials back to the soil. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their particular needs are met.

Earth and Space Structures: ESS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers for changes in a landscape over time to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

Supporting Content:

Local, regional, and global patterns of rock formations reveal changes over time due to earth or other forces.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-5-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago.

Supporting Content:

Fossils provide evidence about the types of organisms that lived long ago and also about the nature of their environments.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the organisms and habitats involved.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. When the environment changes in ways that affect a place's physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-2 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Supporting Content:

Predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Although the species involved in competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments are shared.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-5 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Supporting Content:

Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations.

Life Sciences: LS4-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.

Supporting Content:

The collection of fossils and their placement in chronological order is known as the fossil record and documents the change of many life forms throughout the history of the Earth.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-MS-4 [ICS page]

Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence from rock strata for how the geologic time scale is used to organize Earth's history.

Supporting Content:

The geologic time scale interpreted from rock strata provides a way to organize Earth's history. Examples of Earth's major events could range from being very recent (such as the last Ice Age or the earliest fossils of homo sapiens) to very old.

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