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Garbage: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

First Grade (and others)

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.8 [CCSS page]

With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Suggested Lesson

Make a list of things that can be recycled.

Third Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2 [CCSS page]

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

Suggested Lesson

How long does trash last? Take a look at this Education World site to do the experiment suggested, then write what you found out.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 [CCSS page]

Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

Suggested Lesson

Write a letter to a real or imaginary friend explaining to them why it is important to recycle, protect the environment, or conserve resources.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2 [CCSS page]

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Suggested Lesson

Gather household items that might be thrown away by most people. Make a list of useful ways that those items could be repurposed. Do some research, if necessary, to get in the swing of it. Get creative — you might think of some use for something, that no one else will think of.

Math

Kindergarten

CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4 [CCSS page]

Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.

Suggested Lesson

Sort and count the number of each type of object in the recycling bin in the classroom.

Third Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.A.2 [CCSS page]

Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Suggested Lesson

Towards the end of the day, go through the garbage cans in your classroom. Sort the materials into groups: things thrown away that could have been recycled, reused or repurposed; and things that are trash. You might include cans from other classrooms in your collections. Look for paperclips, crayons and pencils, just as examples. Weigh your collections to see how much trash isn't actually trash. Have a class discussion about what could be done to make changes.

Fifth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.5.MD.C.3 [CCSS page]

Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.

Suggested Lesson

Gather compostable matter and create a compost bin on your school property or off-site, if necessary. Weight all of the matter as you deposit it in the heap. Measure the volume. Weigh it when it has completed its decomposition. Measure the volume again. Is there a difference? Discuss how and why. What can you do with your compost? Create a table of your findings.

Science

Kindergarten

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-K-2 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the environments around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-3 [ICS page]

Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do can affect the world around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things. Examples of human impact on the land could include cutting trees to produce paper and using resources to produce bottles. Examples of solutions could include reusing paper and recycling cans and bottles. Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem's solutions to other people.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

Matter cycles between the air and soil and among plants, animals, and microbes as these organisms live and die. Some organisms, such as fungi and bacteria, break down dead organisms (both plants or plant parts and animals) and therefore operate as decomposers. Decomposition eventually restores (recycles) some materials back to the soil.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the animals and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other. Change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

When the environment changes in ways that affect a place's physical characteristics, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die. Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Earth and Space Systems: ESS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Support, obtain, and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth's resources and environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities in everyday life have effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, and air. Individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth's resources and environments.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-3 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Transfers of matter into and out of the physical environment occur at every level. Decomposers recycle nutrients from dead plant or animal matter back to the soil in terrestrial environments. The atoms that make up the organisms in an ecosystem are cycled repeatedly between the living and nonliving parts of the ecosystem.

Earth and Space Sciences ESS3-MS-3 [ICS page]

Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities can have consequences on the biosphere. Examples of the design process include examining human environmental impacts, assessing the kinds of solutions that are feasible, and designing and evaluating solutions that could reduce that impact.

Engineering and Technology Standards Content - All Grades

ETS1.A: Defining Engineering Problems

A situation that people want to change or create can be approached as a problem to be solved through engineering. Such problems may have many acceptable solutions. Asking questions, making observations, and gathering information are helpful in thinking about problems. Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account. The more precisely a design task's criteria and constraints can be defined, the more likely it is that the designed solution will be successful. Specification of constraints includes consideration of scientific principles and other relevant knowledge that is likely to limit possible solution.

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem's solutions to other people. Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions. A solution needs to be tested, and then modified on the basis of the test results in order to improve it. The iterative process of testing the most promising solutions and modifying what is proposed on the basis of the test results leads to greater refinement and ultimately to an optimal solution. There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet criteria and constraints of a problem.

ETS1.C: Optimizing the Design Solution

Because there is always more than one possible solution to a problem, it is useful to compare and test designs. Different solutions need to be tested in order to determine which of them best solves the problem, given the criteria and the constraints.

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