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Habitat: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.1 [CCSS page]

Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

Suggested Lesson

Select a habitat and form an answer to each of the question words regarding that space. Who lives there, what are the conditions in that habitat that are just right for those creatures, where can this habitat be found, when do the animals eat (hibernate, sleep, migrate, etc.), why do these animals live here and not in a different habitat, how do they hunt, communicate, create shelter, get water. Create a class poster about that habitat and allow several students to illustrate it.

Fifth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.2 [CCSS page]

Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Suggested Lesson

Watch a movie or a science program about habitats (or a specific habitat) and summarize the key points of the presentation.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.9 [CCSS page]

Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).

Suggested Lesson

Act out how one creature might view the environment of a habitat differently than another from the same habitat. Would a mountain goat see a mountain in the same way as a lizard? Or imagine how an animal from one habitat might view another habitat. How would a penguin view a desert habitat?

Math

Kindergarten or First Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.1 [CCSS page]

Count to 100 by ones and by tens.

CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1 [CCSS page]

Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.

Suggested Lesson

The HabCam is a camera placed in the ocean to take pictures of the ocean habitat and wildlife that happens by. Take a look at some of the images and count how many different animals you can see.

Third Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.A.1 [CCSS page]

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

Suggested Lesson

Survival can depend upon how quickly an animal can move. Here is a great lesson (PDF) from the National Wildlife Federation on calculating average speed.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.6.RP.A.3c [CCSS page]

Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100 times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent.

Suggested Lesson

Humans have a habitat too. Many of us purchase homes as our habitat. Check out this set of real-world lessons (PDF) on income and home prices from Habitat for Humanity.

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1 [ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

All animals need food in order to live and grow. They obtain their food from plants or from other animals. Plants need water and light to live and grow. Different foods are needed by different animals.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-K-2 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Examples of plants and animals changing their environment could include a squirrel digs in the ground to hide its food and tree roots can break concrete. Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the environments around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-1 [ICS page]

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.

Supporting Content:

Living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need. Examples of relationships could include that deer eat buds and leaves, therefore, they usually live in forested areas; and, grasses need sunlight so they often grow in meadows.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-3 [ICS page]

Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environments.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the environment around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things. Examples of human impact on the land could include cutting trees to produce paper, and examples of solutions could include reusing paper. Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem's solutions to other people.

Second Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-2-1 [ICS page]

Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

Supporting Content:

There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water.

Third Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-3-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.

Supporting Content:

Interactions with the environment affect the characteristics that organisms develop. Examples of the environment affecting a trait could include normally tall plants grown with insufficient water are stunted.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their needs are met. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Some organisms, such as fungi and bacteria, break down dead organisms and therefore operate as decomposers, eventually recycling some materials back to the soil.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers for changes in a landscape over time to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

Supporting Content:

Local, regional, and global patterns of rock formations reveal changes over time due to earth forces. Examples could include rock layers with marine shell fossils above rock layers with plant fossils and no shells, indicating a change from land to water over time.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-4-1 [ICS page]

Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.

Supporting Content:

Energy and fuels that humans use are derived from natural sources, and their use affects the environment in multiple ways. Examples of environmental effects could include negative biological impacts of wind turbines, erosion due to deforestation, loss of habitat due to dams, loss of habitat due to surface mining, and air pollution from burning of fossil fuels.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-5-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago.

Supporting Content:

Fossils provide evidence about the types of organisms that lived long ago and also about the nature of their environments. Examples of fossils and environments could include marine fossils found on dry land, tropical plant fossils found in Arctic areas, and fossils of extinct organisms.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the organisms and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. When the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Support, obtain, and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth's resources and environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even space. Individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. Emphasis is on cause and effect relationships between resources and growth of individual organisms and the numbers of organisms in ecosystems during periods of abundant and scarce resources.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-2 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Supporting Content:

Examples of types of interactions could include competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial. Predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Mutually beneficial interactions, in contrast, may become so interdependent that each organism requires the other for survival. Although the species involved in these competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments, both living and nonliving, are shared.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-5 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Supporting Content:

Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. Emphasis is on recognizing patterns in data and making warranted inferences about changes in populations, and on evaluating empirical evidence supporting arguments about changes to ecosystems.

Earth and Space Sciences ESS3-MS-3 [ICS page]

Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities can have consequences on the biosphere, sometimes altering natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. Examples of the design process include examining human environmental impacts, assessing the kinds of solutions that are feasible, and designing and evaluating solutions that could reduce that impact. Examples of human impacts can include water usage (such as the withdrawal of water from streams and aquifers or the construction of dams and levees), land usage (such as urban development, agriculture, or the removal of wetlands), and pollution (such as of the air, water, or land).

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