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Salmon: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

First Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.1.1 [CCSS page]

Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

Suggested Lesson

Read aloud the information found on the Salmon Facts page. Create questions together as a class that can be answered from the passages.

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.5 [CCSS page]

Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.

Suggested Lesson

Study this diagram on the parts of fish anatomy. Take the quiz to see if you can remember the parts.

Third Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2 [CCSS page]

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

Suggested Lesson

Adopt an animated salmon and watch the challenges that a salmon must endure in order to live a full life. Write a descriptive paragraph telling about your salmon and what happened to it during its life. (requires Adobe Shockwave)

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.2 [CCSS page]

Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

Suggested Lesson

Make a detailed list of challenges that could shorten the life of a salmon and write it into paragraph form.

Math

First Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.A.1 [CCSS page]

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Suggested Lesson

Use fish crackers to represent salmon while discussing addition and subtraction of salmon from a river or lake. Mention variables such as salmon leaving to head to the ocean, being eaten by predators, the hatching of alevin, or fisheries managers restocking a lake or river from a hatchery.

Third Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.3.NBT.A.2 [CCSS page]

Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Suggested Lesson

Using the following chart, and/or additional resources, calculate how many days a salmon lives.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.1 [CCSS page]

Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. For example, know that 1 ft is 12 times as long as 1 in. Express the length of a 4 ft snake as 48 in. Generate a conversion table for feet and inches listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), ...

Suggested Lesson

Using a map and a ruler, calculate the distance that a salmon travels from a given hatching site to the ocean and back. Follow all available rivers and tributaries in order to make the most accurate analysis.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.6.RP.A.3c [CCSS page]

Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100 times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent.

Suggested Lesson

Using this guide this guide or other resources, calculate how many days a salmon lives.

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1 [ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

All animals need food in order to live and grow. They obtain their food from plants or from other animals. Different foods are needed by different animals. All living things need water.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-K-2 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the environments around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-1 [ICS page]

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.

Supporting Content:

Living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-3 [ICS page]

Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environments.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the environment around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things. Examples of human impact on the land could include cutting trees to produce paper, and examples of solutions could include reusing paper. Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem's solutions to other people.

First Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-1-1 [ICS page]

Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Animals have body parts that capture and convey different kinds of information needed for growth and survival. Animals respond to these inputs with behaviors that help them survive. Different animals use their body parts in different ways to see, hear, protect themselves, move from place to place, and seek and take in food.

Life Sciences: LS1-1-2 [ICS page]

Read texts and use media to determine patterns in behavior of parents and offspring that help offspring survive.

Supporting Content:

Adult animals can have young. In many kinds of animals, parents and the offspring themselves engage in behaviors that help the offspring to survive.

Life Sciences: LS1-1-3 [ICS page]

Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles, but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Supporting Content:

Reproduction is essential to the continued existence of every kind of organism. Changes animals go through during their life form a pattern.

Life Sciences: LS2-1-1 [ICS page]

Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

Supporting Content:

Individuals of the same kind of animal are recognizable as similar but can also vary in many ways. Young animals are very much, but not exactly like, their parents. An individual of a particular breed looks like its parents but is not exactly the same.

Second Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-2-1 [ICS page]

Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

Supporting Content:

There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water. Emphasis is on the diversity of living things in each of a variety of different habitats.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-2-3 [ICS page]

Obtain information to identify where water is found on Earth and that it can be solid, liquid or gas.

Supporting Content:

Water is found in the ocean, rivers, lakes, and ponds.

Third Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-3-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

Supporting Content:

Being part of a group helps animals obtain food, defend themselves, and cope with changes.

Life Sciences: LS2-3-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.

Supporting Content:

Interactions with the environment affect the characteristics that organisms develop.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Supporting Content:

Animals have various body systems with specific functions for sustaining life: skeletal, circulatory. respiratory, muscular, digestive, etc.

Life Sciences: LS1-4-2 [ICS page]

Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways.

Supporting Content:

Different sense receptors are specialized for particular kinds of information, which may be then processed by the animal's brain. Animals are able to use their perceptions and memories to guide their actions.

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their needs are met. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Some organisms, such as fungi and bacteria, break down dead organisms and operate as decomposers. Matter cycles among plants, animals, and microbes as these organisms live and die.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-4-1 [ICS page]

Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.

Supporting Content:

Energy and fuels that humans use are derived from natural sources, and their use affects the environment in multiple ways. Examples of renewable energy resources could include water behind dams. Examples of environmental effects could include loss of habitat due to dams.

Fifth Grade

Physical Sciences: PS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Use models to describe that energy in animals' food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.

Supporting Content:

Food provides animals with the materials they need for body repair and growth and the energy they need to maintain body warmth and for motion. The energy released from food was once energy from the sun that was captured by plants in the chemical process that forms plant matter (from air and water).

Life Sciences: LS2-5-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.

Supporting Content:

Populations of animals are classified by their characteristics. An example of cause and effect relationships could be animals that have better camouflage coloration than other animals may be more likely to survive and therefore more likely to leave offspring.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the animals and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

Changes in environments affect the organisms living there. Examples of environmental changes could include changes in land characteristics, water distribution, and other organisms. When the environment changes, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-5-2 [ICS page]

Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

Supporting Content:

Nearly all of Earth's available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers, polar ice caps, or underground; only a tiny fraction is in rivers and lakes.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Support, obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth's resources and environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, and populations of organisms. Individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth's resources and environments.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS1-MS-3 [ICS page]

Use argument supported by evidence for how a living organism is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.

Supporting Content:

In multicellular animals, the body is a system of multiple interacting subsystems. These subsystems are groups of cells that work together to form tissues. Tissues form organs that are specialized for particular body functions.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. Emphasis is on cause and effect relationships between resources and growth of individual organisms and the numbers of organisms in ecosystems during periods of abundant and scarce resources.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-2 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Supporting Content:

Although the species involved in these competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments are shared. Emphasis is on predicting consistent patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the relationships among and between organisms.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-3 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Food webs are models that demonstrate how matter and energy is transferred between producers, consumers, and decomposers as the three groups interact within an ecosystem. Decomposers recycle nutrients from dead plant or animal matter back to the water in aquatic environments.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-5 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Supporting Content:

Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in its populations.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-6 [ICS page]

Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Supporting Content:

Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth's ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem's biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. Changes in biodiversity can influence ecosystem services that humans rely on.

Life Sciences: LS4-MS-4 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase some individuals' probability of surviving and reproducing in a specific environment.

Supporting Content:

Natural selection leads to the predominance of certain traits in a population, and the suppression of others. Emphasis is on using concepts of natural selection in animals, such as overproduction of offspring, passage of time, variation in a population, selection of favorable traits, and heritability of traits.

Life Sciences: LS4-MS-5 [ICS page]

Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms.

Supporting Content:

In artificial selection, humans have the capacity to influence certain characteristics of organisms by selective breeding. One can choose desired parental traits determined by genes, which are then passed on to offspring.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-MS-3 [ICS page]

Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

Supporting Content:

Examples of human impacts can include water usage (such as the withdrawal of water from streams and aquifers or the construction of dams and levees), land usage (such as urban development or the removal of wetlands), and pollution (such as of the air, water, or land). Examples of the design process include examining human environmental impacts, assessing the kinds of solutions that are feasible, and designing and evaluating solutions that could reduce that impact.

Earth and Space Sciences ESS3-MS-4 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth's systems.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence include grade-appropriate databases on human populations and the rates of consumption of natural resources (such as freshwater and energy). The consequences of increases in human populations and consumption of natural resources are described by science, but science does not make the decisions for the actions society takes. Technology and engineering can potentially mitigate impacts on Earth's systems as both human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase.

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